WOW! How time changes things.

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The Combat Hard Training Center in Jonesboro, GA is officially closed permanently!  It was an extremely wonderful experience and I truly appreciate all the individuals that journeyed with us.  The future is before us and I know many great opportunities are just waiting.

This website will now become the focal point for “Combat Hard”.  Updates, seminar listing and ideas will be shared here.

A really Big Thank You to all that support the Training Center over the years.  I look forward to seeing and training with all of you again in 2014.

Happy New Year!

Lowering your Victim profile – become the “Grey Person”!

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In a August 1996 Guns & Ammo article written by Jim Grover a.k.a Kelly McCann, the following points were outlined to help you lower your victim profile.

  • Dress to blend whenever possible
  • Watch the overt display of affluence
  • Walk with another whenever possible
  • Move away quickly from sudden impediments to your movement
  • Keep away from walls (i.e., stay out of arm’s reach) when turning corners while walking
  • Use physical barriers whenever possible
  • Develop contingencies
  • Don’t let embarrassment or pride deter you from using good security precautions
  • LOOK for trouble
  • Always carry a less-than-lethal weapon
  • Don’t second-guess yourself if you truly believe, This is it!!!!

I believe the image you want to project is the one (the grey person) that the average person will forget the second he takes his eyes off of you, however, you also want to project one that the bad-guy “DO” notice and know you are not to be messed with.  You can do this by projecting a positive, aware and alert image! Everyone agrees that the criminal is looking for the easy target.  Don’t be that target! Just be careful not to be the one identified as the Guy or Gal with the gun.

How do you become the individual that is aware, alert, and is not a soft target? You do this by training and actually being capable of putting up a fight, by looking alive when you have to, yet not look like a human radar when the situation doesn’t require it. No need to be paranoid, but be ALERT!  Think in terms of Colonel Jeff Cooper’s condition yellow;

CONDITION YELLOW-   This is a relaxed state of general alertness, with no specific focal point. You are not looking for anything or anyone in particular; you simply have your head up and your eyes open.  You are alert and aware of your surroundings.  You do not expect to be attacked today but you recognize the possibility.

Anything or anyone in your immediate vicinity that is unusual, out of place, or out of context, should be viewed as potentially dangerous, until you have had a chance to assess it. When your mental radar picks up on a blip, you should immediately be prepared escalate up to the next level.

Here is one additional suggestion, watch what you wear.  Consider dull colors, current fashion and be careful about wearing the latest 5.11 fashions, tactical rigger belts and vests.  I am not suggesting that you never wear these types of clothing, I do.  My suggestion is to blend them with other civilian clothing and try not to look like the latest tactical fashion model or civilian private security contractor.  Take a little time and do a 360-degree evaluation of yourself and see yourself through the eyes of others.  This is obviously the pathway to self-awareness and will certainly enhance your self-protection skills.  The following Scottish poet by Robert Burns praised the importance of the 360-degree evaluation:

Oh that the gods
The gift would gi’e us
To see ourselves
As others see us

Being the Grey Person take a little effort but is extremely important in the world today.  The 3 Cs, criminals, crazies and crusaders are looking for the easy target, don’t be that target.  Remember the motto, “Train Today for Tomorrow’s Battles!”

Gunfighting 101: The basic Threes!

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Recently, I taught a firearms course in Liberty, SC at Foothills Firearms Training Center.  We were discussing gunfighting and the question came up, so what Gunfighting 101 skills do we need?  I believe it all starts with the Basic Threes!

1.  Most gunfights happen a 3 feet or less.

2.  Most gunfights are over in 3 seconds.

3.  Only 3 rounds or less are shot during the actual event.

Ok!  So where does this information come from; The internet, interviews of criminals, actual police shooting or did we just make it up?  Well, I say does it really matter?

In my opinion, the answer is no it does not matter.  We need to start our basic firearms training with some point of reference, so lets start with the Basic Threes.    Here are a few suggestions;

1.  Practice until you can draw and fire your weapon from concealed carry position in less 3 seconds or less.  This will take a little effort but it can be done.

2.  Practice to effectively fire three shots to body or head in 3 seconds or less. 

3.  Now do all of the above, standing, seated, sitting, kneeling or from any other position.  This will certainly be a challenge but it is not impossible. 

Who knows, maybe next week, it will be determined that 5 feet is the distance with 4 rounds and 6 seconds.  If that happens, then we will re-group and start our training from a different reference point.  However, until that does happen, I am going to stick with the Basic Threes! 

As always, I look forward to hearing your comments, opinions and thoughts about training and what you are doing.  Please train safely and effectively.

Which is best? Spartan or Luxurious Training Facilities!

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So which is it?  I know we all love comfort and I know that luxury can be very intoxicating. I have had the opportunity to train at both state-of-the-art facilities and hole-in-the-wall facilities.  Which was best?  I chose Spartan facilities any day.  I find that I tend to relax too much when I workout in luxury and my effort is not the same. Luxury can be very distracting.  This may be a personal thing but, think about it and let me know your thoughts.

The photo approve is a firearms range training facility in the country of Jordan.  I would say it could be considered very Spartan.  The training conducted there was very intense and the practice that occurred was deep-seated because there were obviously no distractions.

Please do not misunderstand me!  I love modern range facilities with moving and turning targets and all the other cool stuff.  However, when it is time for some serious combat training, nothing beats a simple range, where you must use your creativity to make the training beneficial.

In the “Little Book of Talent”, by Daniel Coyle, it is stated that “Simple, humble spaces help focus attention on the deep-practice task at hand: reaching and repeating and struggling”.

So what do you think?  I would love to hear your thoughts on this issue.  While you are thinking about it, I am going to get some dry-fire practice in.  All the best.

Incognito?

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Here is a great quote from a great book!  “The goal is to invest thousands of hours of training so that in the heat of the battle the right maneuvers will come automatically, with no interference from consciousness.”  – David Eagleman

Is your training incognito? So the big question is, what amount of time are you spending on your self-protection training?  Once a month, once a week, once a day or very infrequently?  Here is an interesting measuring tool!

Amateur Talent – 2000 hours of practice

Average Talent – 5000 hours of practice

Expect Abilities – 10000 hours of practice

Yes, that is a lot of practice time.  Just remember, focus on mastering the basics, they will be there when you need them.  In my opinion, way to much time is spent on practicing so-called advance skills and letting the basic skills deteriorate.

Practice your basic self-protection skills daily to include your situational awareness. You should also study your body’s external and internal natural reactions to fear.  Why?  This way you will know what to expect when faced with sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activation.  Remember, the SNS is most likely activated from the FEAR of Death, Serious Bodily Injury or Pain.  Our goal is to calm the fires of the SNS and get the PNS (para-sympathetic nervous) system back in control.  One simple method to do this is BREATHING!  I will discuss this more in future post.

Ok, enough talking.  Get out there and train.  Do something today to enhance your Self-Protection skills and be safe!

British Combat Association!

Sometimes I forget and I need a friendly reminder.  Today I received two friendly reminders about the same oversight on my part.  I have made 43 post and no where have I mentioned an extremely important influence in my Pistol Combatives  and the Combat Hard Krav Maga and Combatives curriculum.  

That influence is the British Combat Association led by Peter Consterdine and Geoff Thompson.  I have not met Mr. Thompson to date, but I have had the true pleasure of sitting down and talking with Mr. Consterdine.  We met in a hotel lobby in Manchester several years ago and talked for several hours.  He is a true security professional and an incredible martial arts coach.  I even had the experience of holding the striking pad for a light version of his double hip strike. When he hit me, it did not feel light, but I am sure he took it easy on me, because we had not had lunch yet.  LOL!

Here is an excellent overview of the BCA.  BCA-Info-Pack.  And here are some of the products they produce.  All are highly recommended!

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I am also participating in World Combat Association (WCA) Combat Coach Diploma Award Program.  One more step and I will have completed the Instructor portion and then I start working the Combat Coach.  

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Alright!  So check out the BCA and let me know your thoughts.  They are a great resources and some of the best martial arts coaches in the world.  Thank you, British Combat Association and Peter Consterdine!

 

RCAT!

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Here is a basic handgun defense principle.  “RCAT” – Redirect, Control, Attack and Takeaway. 

First we redirect the muzzle of the weapon from all body parts.  This might also mean that you move your body, not just push the weapon away.  Get the line of fire off your body.

Next we control the weapon.  Remember leverage!  Once the muzzle is redirected, you should get control of either the weapon or the weapon hand. 

The third step is attack.  An aggressive counter attack is suggested.  This might be accomplished with an empty hand , knife or even you own handgun.  If you decide to engage with your handgun, just remember, you are up close and personal, do not give your adversary your firearm.  Maintain a good weapon retention position while you are firing and watch out for your own arm.

Finally, disarm the assailant.  This might be accomplished when the bullet penetrates his chest cavity or after the empty hand counter attack you get two hands on the firearm and dislodge it from his grip.

Practice, practice and more practice is the key.  Also do not forget realism and safety.  During a violent encounter or combat and activation of the Sympathetic Nervous System (SNS) will occur.  The activation of the SNS is often referred to as the “Fight or Flight Syndrome”.  It is activated by FEAR of Death, Serious Bodily Injury or Pain.  Realistic Force on Force drills utilizing proper protective equipment can create a reasonable facsimile of combat.  These drills are extremely important to include in your daily training. 

Remember this quote and make this a goal of your training, “To master self-defence so well as to never have to kill anyone…” –  Imi Lichtenfeld